Archive for the 'mysql' Category

FeedBlendr Up For Acquisition

Friday, March 7th, 2008

I am currently looking for someone who is willing to acquire FeedBlendr and take over the operations of the service. It would be up to them whether they kept it publicly-accessible or took the technology and rolled it into part of something else.

Here’s some information if you’re interested in taking over (or just if you like numbers :) )

  • Runs from Amazon EC2, so if you’re willing to add additional instances to the pool, it can scale out.
  • Currently almost 16,000 blends in the database.
  • Those blends are compiled from over 65,000 source feeds.
  • In February (short month), FeedBlendr pushed 150 Gig of data “in” and 200 Gig “out”.
  • Approximately 50 new blends are created each day.
  • According to Compete.com, FeedBlendr gets more than a couple thousand hits a day and growing.
  • The site actually sees a couple hundred page impressions per day — the vast majority of requests are for feeds/blends from the system (that’s the point)
  • The (MySQL) database is hosted externally (on DreamHost!) but you could move it somewhere else (and I’d recommend that you do)
  • DNS is managed from DynDNS, but you could transfer it to anywhere you prefer.

Whoever acquires FeedBlendr will get the following:

  1. The domain “feedblendr.com”,
  2. All code (PHP) that powers the site including the app itself, WordPress templates, site UI,
  3. The database behind the service (including this WordPress-powered blog)
  4. Amazon AMI used to host the site (to be moved to your own S3 bucket and changed over to using your credentials),
  5. My assistance transferring everything over to your servers/accounts/control,
  6. Gratitude from the people using the service (and from me).

If you’re interested, please email beau@feedville.com directly.

FeedBlendr Updates Live

Monday, May 21st, 2007

So those updates that I mentioned I was working on… they’re live now!

As mentioned in that post, this was mostly a bunch of core upgrades that you really won’t see any major differences from, but it makes life a lot easier for me going forward. It’s looking like it might also help with some of the caching problems we’ve been having (since I had to completely overhaul the caching system to factor in my new globalized caching code).

I’ll be keeping an eye on things to make sure the new code settles in nicely, but please let me know here or via email if you notice anything strange.

And that post about Amazon EC2 and S3 is coming soon, honestly :-) I’ll try to get it written up tomorrow, but I want to give it the attention it deserves.